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Advice from Counselors

Advice from Counselors

Want to help your child succeed in college? Here are some important things you can do.

  1. College students have more freedom and consequently more responsibilities. Encourage your new college student to make wise decisions about class attendance, studying and exhibiting appropriate behavior.
  2. Full-time students will need to spend approximately 25 hours a week outside of class on homework and studying. Help your new college student balance school, work and chores at home.
  3. Make sure that your new college student knows that reading and studying are homework, even though the college professors may not check to see if students completed it.
  4. Encourage your new college student to take notes when meeting with professors, advisors, counselors and other college staff.
  5. The College of Lake County has a very diverse student population. Support your new college student’s efforts to learn about and appreciate differences.
  6. The College of Lake County adheres to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Therefore, college employees are not allowed to give you information about your new college student’s grades, test scores, classes, attendance, conversations with advisors, counselors, professors and other college staff.
  7. Request that your new college student establish academic and career goals during his/her first year at CLC.
  8. Encourage your new college student to become independent and take an active role in learning inside and outside of the classroom. Asking questions, speaking up for oneself, assuming responsibility for one’s education and making decisions are invaluable skills that lead to success in school and in life.
  9. Advise your new college student to seek help immediately if he/she is struggling academically, socially or emotionally.
  10. Flexibility and adapting to change are important skills for parents and new college students. A number of factors can influence the timeframe for degree completion, e.g., starting with developmental (pre-college) courses, repeating courses to earn better grades, stopping out of school due to unforeseen circumstances, changing majors/degree programs and more. Your new college student may need more than two years to finish a degree.