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The following course information is effective for the Fall 2018 term.

CDIS 5 A Reel Look at the Authoritarian Impulse

The Washington Post says democracy dies in darkness. In this series, directors will shed light on how the authoritarian urge can sneak right up on you. Participants will view and discuss a Bob Fosse musical with plenty of divine decadence and a ghost story in which a real scare comes from the rise of fascism. They’ll also look at Andy Griffith manipulating the public in 1957 and then ask whether things are better or worse now. The series will end with a tribute to the late R. Lee Ermey and the depressing duality of humankind. (4 sessions)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 13 Democracy under Siege

In the age of cyber warfare and fake news, attacks against the United States do not require enemy infantry. Now subtler tools are available that can do significant damage to our country. The attackers may assume fake identities and use Facebook or Twitter. What are these weapons? What have they already done? What types of defense can we rely on? What role should our "free press" fulfill in this conflict? What responsibilities do citizens have so they can be informed rather than have their perspectives hacked? Join Professor Gary Midkiff for a lively 90-minute examination of the social media battlefield. (1 session)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 27 Chicago at the Dawn of the American Century / July 16-19

Quest is a four day program for adults at the Southlake Campus in Vernon Hills. We will explore the topic through architecture, economics, film, history, literature and music. Lunch will be provided on the field trip. Otherwise food and beverages are on you own. Recommended reading: In the Mecca by Gwendolyn Brooks

Chicago at the Dawn of the American Century / July 16-19

Monday 9:30-11:30 a.m. – Dave Groeninger
Chicago at the Dawn of the American Century

At the end of World War II, Chicago, then the fourth largest city in the world, was an industrial colossus that stood at the heart of what promised to be “The American Century.” This session will focus on the promise and problems of those years, as Chicagoans transformed their physical city and created some of the lasting cultural innovations that defined 20th century American architecture, literature, music, entertainment and more.

Monday 1-3 p.m. – Robin Kacel
Gwendolyn Brooks: Poet Laureate of Illinois for 32 years
“A poem doesn’t do everything for you,” said Gwendolyn Brooks. “You are supposed to go on with your thinking.”
She was the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1950 and the Illinois Poet Laureate for 32 years. Arriving in Chicago at a time when Saul Bellow and Carl Sandburg were thriving, she offered the compelling voice of African American writers living in Chicago at the turn of the century. From her second story apartment window, she observed the human struggles of inner-city life and captured them in A Street in Bronzeville, her first collection of poetry. Brooks’ courage, honesty, and ability to convey what Richard Wright called, “the whimpers of the wounded” will astound and inspire you.

Tuesday 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. – In collaboration with Michelangelo Sabatino, Dean, College of Architecture, IIT and Kevin Harrington, Professor Emeritus of Architectural History, Department of Humanities, IIT

Field Trip to Illinois Institute of Technology
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's design for the new campus of the Illinois Institute of Technology marked the beginning of his successful and highly influential American career, following two decades of critical esteem in his native Germany. In addition he transformed the curriculum of the school's school of architecture. Beginning with a morning presentation in S R Crown Hall, followed by a box lunch, the day will conclude with a comprehensive walking tour of Mies's campus and buildings, as well as more recent buildings by Skidmore Owings and Merrill, Helmut Jahn, the Office of Metropolitan Architecture and John Ronan. (There will be 1-1/2 miles of walking).

Wednesday 9:30-11:30 a.m. – Ed Torrez, AIA, LEED AP
Chicago’s Record Row 1950-1970

This presentation will share some insights and discuss the music history of Chicago during the 1950’s and 1960’s which was a major influence in the development of rock and roll, R&B and soul music. Moving from S. Cottage Grove, Chicago’s Record Row was relocated to S. Michigan where as many as 17 record distributors and half a dozen independent recording companies were located. The presentation will also discuss other early independent recording studios and record distributors and share some of the stories on how they influenced the music industry and in some ways provided an avenue and resources for Black professionals to emerge within the industry and a segregated society.

Wednesday 1-3 p.m. – Barry Bradford
Richard J. Daley

From 1955-1976 Richard J. Daley was Mayor of Chicago. This multimedia presentation covers the years of Daley – from his roots on the South Side and involvement in the 1919 race riots in Chicago through his methodical climb through the Democratic Party until he reached the pinnacle of total and unchallenged power for two decades. We will look at how he used building programs to reshape the city and consolidate power, how he dealt with the emerging civil rights revolution and his slow loss of power after Democratic Convention of 1968.

Thursday 9:30-11:30 a.m. – Gary Midkiff
A Raisin in the Sun

"What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore and then run?
Maybe it just sags like a heavy load?
Or does it explode?"

Chicago's promise of greatness was subverted by housing segregation, declining quality in public education, a scandal infested police force and excessive attention to the lake front rather than the west side. Chicago may have been the city that worked, but it was also the city of bureaucratic myopia. It is important to understand what went wrong.

Thursday 12:30-3 p.m. – John Kupetz
Film / Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun on Screen

What happens to a dream deferred? With A Raisin in the Sun, Chicago-born Lorraine Hansberry gave an answer to Langston Hughes’ question. When her play opened in 1959, she also became the first African-American woman to have a play produced on Broadway. We’ll look at the 1961 film version with her adapted screenplay and the original Broadway cast -- including Sidney Poitier. Participants will then discuss how Hansberry’s play still speaks more than 50 years later and addresses issues of race, gender and class in a nation that is still deferring the dreams of some of its people.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 60 The Years of Lincoln

A fascinating look at our greatest president! Historian Barry Bradford will lead us through a four-week class. Each session will focus on a different topic. You won't want to miss this multifaceted look at Lincoln's life, leadership, and image.
(4 sessions)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 61 Best of Broadway

Cultural historian and self-professed Broadway Nerd Barry Bradford returns with a lively, informative and revealing look at the top Broadway shows that play Chicago this year. Featuring behind the scenes stories, rare video clips and lots of music we will learn the stories behind some of Broadway's best. Shows may include Dear Evan Hansen, Ragtime, Waitress, White Christmas, The Sound of Music, South Pacific and Beauty and the Beast. (3 sessions)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 65 The End of the Hausfrau? German Women Today

This year the Germans, and especially the German women, are celebrating the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage which was granted to them in 1918. One hundred years later one can indeed say that emancipation has reached Europe’s most populous nation full force: the country is led by a female chancellor, a record number of women are working, and they are eclipsing men in terms of education and career goals. All this progress, though, does not come without its drawbacks. Join German historian Anette Isaacs, M.A. for a discussion of what it is like to be a woman in today’s German society. (1 session)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 66 Silent Heroes: An Important and Long Overdue Look at the Resistance Movement in Nazi Germany

The 85th anniversary of Adolf Hitler’s rise to power in Germany presents us with the perfect opportunity to look at the relatively unknown and sometimes even forgotten heroes who often gave their lives in order to fight against the Nazi regime. Join German historian Anette Isaacs, M.A. as she pays homage to Sophie and Hans Scholl, Georg Elser, Baron von Stauffenberg, the women of Rosenstrasse, and other groups who made up the German Resistance. (1 session)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 72 Prussia’s Glory: The Hohenzollern Dynasty

With the abdication of Kaiser Wilhelm II 100 years ago this fall, monarchy came to an end in Germany. This anniversary is a welcome and timely opportunity to look back at this rather infamous ruler and his illustrious dynasty that consisted of seven kings and three emperors. Join German historian Anette Isaacs and explore the colorful history of the House of Hohenzollern, a family that shaped Germany’s fate like no other. (1 session)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 74 The Early Frontiersman

The likes of Daniel Boone, Simon Kenton and Davy Crockett paved the way for early Americans to move west. Their persistence, determination and grit are legendary. Learn their stories and decide if there are any equals in today's America. (2 sessions)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 76 Robert Frost: Poetry as Spirituality

Robert Frost, America’s favorite 20thcentury poet, presented himself as an amiable grandfather, bristly but cuddly. In reality, however, his poetry searched life’s dark and uncertain corners. Beneath the easy surface lay a mind questioning God, relationships, and the meaning of it all. This presentation examines Frost’s life, his craft, and several of his most important poems. (1 session)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 79 The Boys in the Boat

Athletes participate in over 70 organized team sports. But in only one of them – rowing – is the competition continuous. The physical exertion is equivalent to processing as much oxygen as a thoroughbred racehorse on the home stretch.
Take this event and an American team from the University of Washington and put them in Nazi Germany’s 1936 Olympics and you have a story that Hollywood could not invent.

This presentation is based on the best-selling book “The Boys in the Boat” by Daniel Brown. Those who attend are encouraged to read the book but it is not required. (1 session)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

CDIS 85 America Emerges onto the World Stage

Teddy Roosevelt, William Taft and Woodrow Wilson pushed and pulled the United States onto the world stage. Our Presidents from 1865 through 1901 were more concerned about domestic matters. However these three men understood that the United States needed to play a larger role and each made a contribution in that regard. (2 sessions)

Typically Offered: Offered summer, fall & spring.

Offered Fall 2018: No

  • Subject:
    CDIS
  • Units:
    0.00

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