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Meet the Professors

Bruce Moy
Instructor, Chemistry
A151
847/543-2308
bio552@clcillinois.edu


Specialties: Chemistry and its relationship to everyday life.

Teaching full time at CLC since: 2005; CLC chemistry department chairperson; previously taught at Harper College. Professor Moy also developed and established the nanotechnology program and first nanotechnology course at CLC, in collaboration with engineering and physics faculty; previously conducted research in cancer and infectious diseases, an effort that included full-length and peer-reviewed publications, abstracts and presentations; received student-support grants to implement peer- and dedicated-class tutoring; received an international studies grant for global chemistry, with emphasis on Asian culture and society.

Subjects taught at CLC: Introductory chemistry, general chemistry, organic chemistry and introductory nanotechnology.

Education: B.S., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Georgetown University.

What I do to engage students: When I teach, I try to foster a positive learning environment. I enjoy seeing students grow in self-confidence, strive for a quality education and succeed in their career goals.


Tara Simmons
Instructor, Chemistry
A151
847/543-2309
bio549@clcillinois.edu


Teaching full time at CLC since: 2003; previously taught at West Virginia University and Michigan State University.

Education: A.S., College of Lake County; B.A., Barat College; Ph.D., Michigan State University.


Jeanne Simondsen
Instructor, Chemistry
A151
847/543-2877
jsimondsen@clcillinois.edu


Teaching full time at CLC since: 2007; previously taught part time at CLC for eight years.

Education: B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Ph.D., University of Arizona.

What inspires me about my field: I was attracted to chemistry as a field of study while making soap in a high school chemistry course and making nylon in an introductory organic chemistry course in college. To create the “Aha” moment in students, I always try to connect classroom topics to common life experiences and use labs and demonstrations to reinforce lectures. One learns more by doing than by hearing.



Teaching full time at CLC since: 2000; taught part time for CLC 1994-1997; taught three years at the high school level, including two years teaching Advanced Placement courses at Stevenson High School.

Specialties: Analytical chemistry, environmental chemistry.

Subjects taught at CLC: Introductory chemistry, general chemistry and organic chemistry.

Education: B.S. and M.S., DePaul University.

Other professional experience:  17 years of industrial experience working as an analytical chemist for environmental and pharmaceutical firms.

Main goal in teaching: I try to create a nurturing classroom environment that gives students the best opportunity to learn and grow and become more confident in achieving their goals. I strive to provide students with support and guidance that will give them a strong foundation upon which they can build their dreams. More than anything, I want to see my students succeed and move forward.


Beth Wilson
Instructor, Chemistry
A151
847/543-2853
bwilson@clcillinois.edu


Specialties: Research in chemical biology.

Teaching full time at CLC since: 2010; taught chemistry at the University of California-San Diego, Georgia State University and at Mesa Community College; visiting scholar in Madrid, Spain; recipient of graduate student, research and teaching awards; has given 12 presentations at American Chemical Society conferences and has written nine publications.

Subjects taught at CLC: General chemistry and organic chemistry.

Education: B.S., University of Illinois-Chicago; M.S. and Ph.D., Georgia State University.

Most memorable teaching experience: I had a student that struggled with every experimental procedure. Although I had 50 students in this laboratory course, I spent as much time helping her as I could. My explanations and extra help resulted in the student obtaining confidence in chemistry and an excellent grade in the course. The most memorable aspect of this experience was that her frowning and frustration turned into a big and bright smile.